"Basically you get a bunch of fighters together (12 in this case) and get them to punch, kick, bite and thump the bejesus out of each other then you're close."

Street Fighter II: The World Warrior

a game by Capcom

Fighting Games / SNES

 

Street Fighter II: The World Warrior

Street Fighter II: The World Warrior

 

Screenshots

  • Street Fighter II: The World Warrior ScreenshotStreet Fighter II: The World Warrior ScreenshotStreet Fighter II: The World Warrior ScreenshotStreet Fighter II: The World Warrior Screenshot

Street Fighter II: The World Warrior Downloads

SNES Street Fighter II: The World Warrior download

Ryu tightens his black belt. Guile laces his boots. Chun Li sashays into the arena. Blanka emits a blood-curdling growl. Twelve martial arts menaces prepare for the greatest world warrior brawl yet. At long last, it's the main event -- Street Fighter II for the Super NES!

Show Time!

Somehow, Capcom's shrunk the blockbusting, 58 megabit arcade game into a 16 meg Super NES game with minimal sacrificing of graphics, sound, and game play. The SNES translation is nearly everything the coin-op was, and more! Believe it.

Built for Battle

For starters, you and a bud, or you and the computer, fight for the right to advance in the 12 entrant international tournament. Players choose from an identical assortment of eight fighting masters straight-out of the coin-op. The final four boss bruisers only appear in single-player mode.

Each character retains a massive arsenal of basic and advanced techniques. Utilizing three punch buttons and three kick buttons, you bust some fancy flying attacks, fire flaming missiles, and pull body-bashing throws. The most complicated maneuvers require multiple pad and button presses in sequence. Only a handful of minor moves are missing from this Super NES version.

Fight It Your Way

For freedom of fighting, Street Fighter II dishes out tons of great options for customizing the game. You can designate which buttons access the various attacks, listen to a sound test, and adjust the computer's skill level. Bonus stages include car-trashing and brick-smashing sequences (the flaming drums and the rolling barrels from the arcade are gone).

By far the most unique option is the all-new Versus mode. You and a friend pick your fighters and the battleground scenery in a closed off arena built for two-player comfort. You can handicap the severity of each other's blows to even up the match. It even tallies your wins and losses to prove who's best.

The Sights and Sounds of Combat

Living up to the coin-op, Street Fighter ll's graphics sizzle! Minor visual changes include a few missing background characters, partially toned-down blood, the removal of risqué Chun Li moves, and a slight drop in screen resolution. Otherwise, all the smooth action animations, the great multi-scrolling landscapes, and the beautiful color shading must be seen to be believed. Of course, no unnecessary slowdown!

ProTip: Use combination attacks to dizzy your opponent twice in a row.

SFII music maniacs will get a jolt out of the new, re-scored soundtracks. Based on a Japanese CD collection of Street Fighter II tunes, the background selections have great sounding beats. The effects are at times less than arcade quality and some voices are missing, but they're still superb by home system standards.

Player's Choice

Street Fighter II is undisputably awesome, but read on for our personal ratings and tips!

If you like Street Fighter II: The World Warrior, try other games

  • Art of Fighting You play as Ryo, who has come to South Town in search of his kidnapped sister. You'll have to fight through a roster of characters that are bigger, faster, and stronger than you've ever seen before.
  • Weaponlord Weaponlord (sometimes WeaponLord) is a 1- or 2-player fighting game with great graphics.
 
  • Difficulty: Average
  • Available: 1992
  • No. of Levels: 11
  • Theme: Fighting

ATTACK ME IF YOU DARE!

Street Fighter II hits the streets packed with the closest arcade-to-home translations ever seen. Here are some of the features of the home version, and some comparisons between it and the arcade.

In the Option Mode you can customize the game to suit your needs. The level of difficulty for the computer can be adjusted from 0-7 and the time limit can be turned off. Because no two garners were created equal there is a button configuration option. There is also a sound and music test which can be listened to in stereo or mono.

All the stages are intact!!!

A classic match-up between Ryu and Ken. The parallax scrolling on the floor is smooth throughout; however, the clouds do not parallax scroll like in the arcade. The signs break when you throw your opponent into them, just like the arcade version.

Here you can see Honda keeping Ken away with a lightning hand special attack. This stage has remained the same as the arcade, except the water does not overflow from the bath during the game. Instead, you will see the water drip from the ceiling onto the ground.

Blanka's stage is still one of the most graphically intense levels in the game. All the background animation is the same, although a few of the spectators are missing in this version and the people in the house do not animate. Blanka is countering Ken's dragon punch with a shock.

Mister Special Forces himself is back. That's right, Guile is here and he's tougher than ever. His level remains unchanged. However, one major thing we noticed is that the well-known handcuff and freeze tricks do not work on this version.

Ken and Ryu battle it out once again, this time on Ken's home turf. The classic harbor scene has been translated almost perfectly, lacking only the wave action in the water and some animation in the characters. The barrels can be broken by throwing your opponent into them.

On to China, where Chun Li awaits. In the market scene, you will come face-to-face with the strongest woman in the world (or so she says). This cart provides great animation of the background characters, especially the people on the bikes. Amazingly, there is no slowdown!

Zangief dodges Ken's fireball and gives him a nice wake-up call with his right fist. His level remains almost entirely the same, except for some minute detail and animation associated with the rowdy group of spectators. He can be a pretty tough customer, so stay on your toes!

Dhalsim's stage in India has to be the most animated level in the arcade, and it is in the home version as well. This stage did suffer the loss of two elephants (probably due to slowdown) - now, only four elephants are seen. Also, the elephants don't make any noise.

 

Street Fighter II lives!

SFII for SNES!

Can a monster-size arcade machine be crammed into a 16-megabit Super Nintendo game? From the looks of the SF II preview cart, the answer may well be a resounding "Yes!" Capcom went full speed ahead with a nearly IDENTICAL conversion of the Street Fighter II coin-op!

As in the arcade arenas, the home version contains 12 World Warriors, including Guile, Chun Li, Blanka, Dhalsim, E. Honda, Ryu, Ken, and Zangief. Players can choose their fighter from a group of eight. Then you fight the remaining seven for the right to meet the four champions: Balrog, Vega, Sagat, and M. Bison.

But wait, there's more. If you're a Street Fighter II music buff, catch an earful of the all-new, re-scored music tracks. Also, if you're concerned about a lack of maneuverability on the SNES pad, don't worry. You can reprogram the A B, X, Y, l and R buttons any way you wish to facilitate your favorite moves and attacks. If that weren't enough, Capcom plans to market a separate Street Fighter II joystick, which will truly bring the Street Fighting arcade experience to your living room.

Street Fights to Come

We're still anxiously awaiting a final, reviewable version, but the preliminary cart has the collective GamePro staff slavering for more. Come this July, Capcom may give several million Street Fighters a convincing reason to rush out and buy a Super Nintendo system.

At long last, we have official confirmation. Ryu, Ken, Guile, Chun Li, Dhalism, and the rest of the Street Fighter II gang are on their way to an SNES near you in a 16-megabit martial arts explosion. The moves, the attacks, the pain, the frustration, and the thrill of heated mano-a-mano conflict are all part of the Street Fighting experience. Capcorn assures us that all the elements of the current king of the coin-op hill will be incorporated.

Each of the twelve characters (you choose from eight) has personalized fighting style, animations, and controls. They're all cool, but they're so different that everyone finds at least one or two World Warriors to bond with and master. Like in the arcade, a second player can "join in" any time, only it won't cost you a quarter.

 

Street Fighter 2: The World Warrior is a fighting game and is the second in the Street Fighter series. It is also the most successful, as of 2010 being the developer’s (Capcom) best seller. It is regarded as the founder of the fighting game genre as we know it today.

It brought many improvements compared to its predecessor, in terms of both graphics and gameplay. The sprites all have a multitude of animations and the stages all feature different designs along with music. The storyline is very generic and boils down to the final boss planning to take over the world, while a group of skilled fighters try to stop him, each with their own motivations.

Where Street Fighter 2 really shines is its gameplay. You fight your opponents one-on-one using various basic and special moves until one of the combatants’ health bar is completely depleted. The basic moves are assigned to single buttons, while a series of commands results in a more complex and more powerful move. Normally, the one who wins two out of three matches is declared the winner, but draws and sudden death rounds may occur. The game also features a two-player mode and bonus rounds where you can collect extra points by smashing barrels, for example.

You may pick from eight playable characters, each with its own design and abilities, as opposed to Street Fighter where the two choices were identical, save for their aesthetics. There are also four non-playable characters which act as the final elite after all of the seven others have been defeated in the tournament. Each character has their own background and personal story, adding more flavor to the game.

Now, it may not seem like Street Fighter 2 offers anything special, but keep in mind that at the time of its release it provided some ground-breaking features and a particularly large and diverse roster of selectable characters. Although the concept behind the genre is incredibly simple, it has lasted to this day because it offers maximum replay value.

Street Fighter 2 features:

  • A roster of 8 completely different characters in terms of both visuals and gameplay.
  • Four non-playable characters with stronger than usual abilities to challenge you.
  • Two-player mode to challenge your friends.
  • Unlimited enjoyment. No two battles are ever the same.
 

Street Fighter II is a popular video game developed by Capcom and published on the market in 1991. The game was a spin-off for Street Fighter I, game released in 1987 by the same developer. The game is a competitive fighting game style, originally released as a coin-operated arcade game.

Besides many concepts in the first game, Street Fighter II improves a lot and includes now command-based special moves and a six-button configuration. The game offers the players a selection of lots of characters they can play with. Each one of them has its own fighting style, special movies, weaknesses and strengths.

The game is considered as one of the most popular fighting game of the 90s and was very successful at that time. The developers published the game on lots of other platforms, such as Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES), PC, Sega Mega Drive/Genesis, or Wii.

Street Fighter II, also known as The World Warrior, is the first iteration of the Street Fighter II series, and was released in 1991. The original game features eight players the users could have chosen from, but also four characters fully controlled by the CPU.

Ryu is a Japanese martial artist, Ken is a former rival of Ryu, Honda is a sumo wrestler from Japan, Chun-Li is a female martial artist from China, Blanka is a beast-like man, Zangief is a pro wrestler from USSR, Guile is a former special forces operative from the United States and Dhalsim is a Yoga master from India. These are the eight characters the players can choose from. Balrog (American boxer), Vega, Sagat and Bison are the four bosses who can only be controlled by the CPU.

Street Fighter II was followed by many spin-offs, including Street Fighter Alpha, Street Fighter EX, Street Fighter III, Pocket Fighter, Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo and others. Capcom also released Street Fighter IV in 2008 and ported it to Xbox360 and PlayStation 3 in February 2009. The game was developed and published for Microsoft Windows in 2009.

The original release of Street Fighter II was very popular and was awarded the Best Game of 1991 in the Fifth Annual Grand Prize. The game also won the Best Action Game and was placed as number one in Best VGM, Best Direction and Best Album. The game won the second place in Best Graphics. Besides M. Bison (also known as Balrog, depending on the version) all the characters were mentioned in the list of Best Characters of 1991, with 7 of them being in the top 10. All the versions of Street Fighter II were sold in millions of copies all over the world.

Awsome and timless fighting game

 
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